How to turn marketing efficiency into growth

Growth leaders are adept at finding money to invest in initiatives that drive revenue. In this interview, Libby Chambers, Western Union’s chief strategy, product, and marketing officer talks with McKinsey’s Barr Seitz about how she has focused on ratcheting up marketing effectiveness and efficiency to release funds for growth programs. Read more.

Here’s Who Could Lead Uber Out of its Scandals

…Who can steer Uber into a new chapter? JP Mangalinda at Yahoo asked me who should be the COO Travis was looking for. I recommended a woman. Here’s why:

Read more with Yahoo Financial.

Taxi!

It’s Cannes and it’s all about Prizes for Great Campaigns…

and great parties!

As you’ll see the secret of great campaigns is that they’re smart, succinct and hold surprise.

http://www.festival-cannes.com/en/festival/

 

 

People are a Brand’s Greatest Asset

If your people are excited and focused, a business will adapt to the change.

people circle

See and Believe

Whether your big or small the only way to know how customers see your business is to look at it through their eyes.

BrandsActive. A New Way to Impact the World

BrandsActive has just launched with a mission to unite brands, pool talent, and tap expertise to provide solutions that will help stop 1.4M children from starving to death across Nigeria, South Sudan, Somalia, and Yemen. Would love your support! http://www.BrandsActive.com

How Uber Can Fix Its Reputation

“An arrogant behemoth”

From Yahoo Financial:

Dean Crutchfield, a New York-based branding specialist, struck an even more dire tone than Kerris.

“The first thing they have to recognize is that brands, like people, get sick,” Crutchfield explained. “Uber needs to admit it’s slightly broken. This was a cool, game-changing brand, and now it’s an arrogant behemoth. It sort of lost itself in its success. One has to respect customer and driver’s emotions, and I think they’ve forgotten about that. It’s a problem not just of their business, it’s a problem of the leadership. That leadership reflects poorly on the brand.”

Crutchfield pointed to United Airlines’ (UAL) recent controversy, in which a passenger was forcibly removed from a flight. United CEO Oscar Munoz exacerbated the public backlash by initially blaming the passenger for the brouhaha. United subsequently issued several apologies and promised a sweeping review of policies, particularly around crew behavior and passenger incentives.

“[T]here was a real arrogance where the CEO did not recognize their weaknesses and faults,” Crutchfield said.

Uber, for its part, knows it has a serious problem on its hands. Kalanick told employees in March he planned on hiring a COO “who can partner with me to write the next chapter in our journey.” Uber board member Arianna Huffington, meanwhile, is helping lead an “urgent” investigation into one engineer’s sexual harassment claims against the company.

But while that’s certainly a start, it’s clear company-wide changes to Uber must go far deeper. Full article.