How A Logo’s Color Shapes Your Mind

screen-shot-2017-03-05-at-5-35-32-pmCut Through The Clutter https://www.fastcodesign.com/3054339/evidence/how-a-logos-color-shapes-consumers-opinion-of-a-brand

Turn Me On

Grscreen-shot-2016-12-16-at-4-11-43-pmeat brands are about storytelling and brand voice success comes when you mitigate the turned-off reaction.

Too Late

images-8Google says 61% of users are unlikely to return to a mobile site they had trouble accessing and 40% visit a competitor’s site instead…Ouch

Sticky Content

-1291% of mobile users say that access to content is very important. Doh

Keep Up

week-1-brand-voice-hallmarkFor brand voice to truly work, a journalistic approach is required, much like a daily newspaper needs fresh content.

Wired’s Best New Logos of 2016

From Instagram to Budweiser, here are the year’s most notable new logos from Wired http://snip.ly/74erj

As Wired put it, “It was a messy year for logos. The presidential candidate with penetrative, Web-1.0-style graphics won. America’s largest art museum drew ire from critics for deviating from its iconic emblem. The Tokyo Organizing Committee scrambled to find a new symbol for the 2020 Olympics, after its original selection faced allegations of plagiarism.

But it wasn’t all chaos. Trends emerged, like fold-over icons and pleasing gradient hues. Designs from the ’60s and ’70s found new life in clever brand revivals. And designers continued to strive towards visual identities that are equal parts user-friendly, attractive, and inventive. We exit 2016 with more logos than we entered with. Below, a selection of the year’s most notable work.”

Procter & Gamble Co. is striking back in the razor wars

screen-shot-2016-12-16-at-9-34-50-amCategory busters abound, P&G fires a salvo with a digital campaign taking aim at online rival Harry’s and Dollar Shave Club. Here’s what I shared with Sharon Terlep at The Wall Street Journal:

“Being less serious — and less ostentatious — is a smart move for Gillette, which turned consumers off with decades of marketing aimed at making men feel obligated to buy its razors. The category has been dominated by inadequacy marketing, with things like ‘The best a man can get,” Gillette’s tagline. The Dollar Shave Club and Harry’s come at it with something fun and innovative. The “Welcome Back” concept creates some curiosity, and that’s what it’s about. The question is: Is it too late?”